KNOW

THE INDIANA LIFELINE LAW

Indiana’s Lifeline Law provides legal amnesty from prosecution for underage drinking, and many related drinking offenses for a person who calls or texts 911. It also covers anyone assisting to report a medical emergency, sexual assault, or other crime.

 

 

Make Good Decisions if you, or someone you know, needs help. Only you can eliminate your fear and know enough to save a life.

 
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KNOW

HOW TO BE PROTECTED

If you and your friends are underage drinking and need help, see a crime, or sexual assault you should:

01

CONTACT 911

CALL OR TEXT 911 immediately and be prepared to give your location and what is happening.

02

STAY

Remain at the scene with the person who needs assistance until help arrives.

03

COOPERATE

Provide any other relevant information requested by law enforcement and cooperate with emergency personnel and law enforcement at the scene.

04

PROTECTED

If you follow all of these steps you will be protected and save a life under the Indiana Lifeline Law.

STAY. COOPERATE. BE PROTECTED.

SAVE A LIFE

 

KNOW

THE SIGNS OF ALCOHOL POISONING

Don’t gamble with your friend’s life. These are the signs of alcohol poisoning that mean they need help!

IF THEY ARE SHOWING ANY OF THESE SIGNS. CALL OR TEXT 911.

Acting confused

Repetitively vomiting

Unusual breathing

Pale Skin or bluish

Loss of bodily functions

Snoring unusually or loudly

Passed Out

 

Frequently asked questions

Why was the Indiana Lifeline Law created?


The fear that being underage and calling the police can lead to jail time. That fear can lead to underage drinkers who need medical assistance, never getting the help they need because their friends were scared of being punished by the law. Indiana’s Lifeline Law was created to eliminate that fear, providing amnesty from prosecution for underage drinking, and many related drinking offenses for a person who calls or texts 911. The goal is simple - sacrifice fear, in order to save a life.




How To Text 911?


- Use the message/messaging icon on your phone (not a downloaded texting app) - Enter “911” in the “TO” field - Type your location and emergency in the message body - “Send” message - Continue your dialog with the 911 center and follow their instructions - Keep messages short and do not use abbreviations - Indiana has Text-to-911, but not all states do




Who is eligible for limited immunity under Indiana’s Lifeline Law?


To qualify for limited immunity, a person must have: - Requested emergency medical assistance for someone else, or acted in concert with a person who made a request - Been the victim of a covered sex offense (includes most common sex offenses) - Witnessed and reported what the person reasonably believed to be a crime




What must an eligible person do to receive limited immunity?


To receive limited immunity, a person described above must: - Provide their full name - Provide any other relevant information requested by law enforcement - Remain at the scene with the person who needs help until help arrives - Cooperate with emergency personnel and law enforcement at the scene




What alcohol-related crimes are covered?


The Lifeline Law provides limited immunity from arrest and prosecution for the following alcohol-related crimes: - Public intoxication - Illegal possession (including possession, consumption and transportation of alcohol)




What about the person who needed help?


- If they’re the victim of a reported sex offense, they’re immune from arrest and prosecution for the alcohol related offenses listed above. - If not, they can be arrested and prosecuted for alcohol-related offenses. If it’s their first offense they can ask to be placed under court supervision, with the chance to earn dismissal of the charges.




What else should I know about Indiana’s Lifeline Law?


The law doesn’t provide immunity from prosecution for charges related to controlled substances (illegal drugs), only alcohol. However, having sought help for someone else for a medical emergency related to their use of alcohol or a controlled substance is a mitigating circumstance that courts can consider when sentencing a person convicted of crime.





 

AFFILIATES

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